Archivi categoria: Walkthroughs

Portrait Battle: 4 Photographers Shoot the Same Model

Photographers Jessica Kobeissi, Irene Rudnyk, and Ruby James are back again with another photo challenge. And this time they’ve invited photographer Derrick Freske to join in on the fun.

As with the group’s previous competition, each photographer was tasked with picking one outfit and location for model Liberty Netuschil for everyone to shoot, resulting in 4 scenarios and 16 final photos. The time limit was 5 minutes on each shot.

Here are the resulting photos from each scenario, and each one has a poll for you to select the winning photographer:

Scenario #1: Pink Skirt (Ruby’s Pick)

Jessica:

Irene:

Ruby:

Derrick:


Scenario #2: Balloons (Jessica’s Pick)

Jessica:

Irene:

Ruby:

Derrick:


Scenario #3: Dress (Irene’s Pick)

Jessica:

Irene:

Ruby:

Derrick:


Scenario #4: Basketball (Derrick’s Pick)

Jessica:

Irene:

Ruby:

Derrick:



And now the final vote: who shot the strongest collection of portraits across the four scenarios?


How to Create a Simple DIY Smoke Effect for Product Shots

This short DIY tutorial by Caleb Pike over at DSLR Video Shooter shows you how to create a great smoke effect for your product shots or B-roll footage—no fancy smoke machine required.

Smoke is an intriguing component of photography, but it’s difficult to produce conveniently and photograph correctly. The direction and thickness of the smoke is never fully under your control and that makes photographing it a challenge. Fortunately, this little DIY technique helps you reign that pesky smoke in.

To do this at home, you’ll need a simple bulb syringe and a smoke-creating vape device made up of a battery and a tank. In Caleb’s case, he used an Eleaf iStick 50W battery attached to a Nautilus Atlantis tank, that he then filled with some kind of vaping liquid.

(Note: Caleb does NOT use liquid that contains nicotine. Nobody is encouraging smoking. Everyone’s lungs are okay. No baby seals were hurt in the making of this video.)

From that point on it’s pretty simple. You press a button on the vaping device to create the vapor, use the bulb syringe to draw it out (sparing your lungs in the process) and then apply that smoke wherever you might need it.

This simple setup is a great way to create and disperse small amounts of smoke exactly where you want it. It’s particularly useful where a big smoke machine would be overkill, filling up the room and ruining your images.

To see the simple idea in action, check out the video above. And if you like this simple tutorial, head over to the DSLR Video Shooter channel for more like it.

(via ISO 1200)

Tips I’ve Learned from Photographing Lightning in South Florida

My name is Alex Brock, and I’m a photo enthusiast living in South Florida. I spent many nights last summer chasing storms through swamps and along the beach attempting to learn to shoot lightning, and I’d like to share some things I learned to help others who are starting out.

I’m a simple hobbyist, so please take these suggestions with a grain of salt or at face value… or whatever — you know what I mean.

Settings usually depend on a few factors: ambient light (dusk, evening, dark night, etc), the distance you are from the storm, and the size of the lighting the storms are putting down.

Example 1: Dusk Lightning

Settings: 6s, f/16, ISO 100
Lens: Tokina 11-16mm

Since this was shot during dusk and I was, by my own admission, entirely too close to this storm, I had shorten the exposure quite a bit and narrow the aperture and keep my ISO at the base. Shutter release cable really comes in handy here, especially for these shorter exposure times.

Example 2: Beach Lightning

Settings: 10s, f/4, ISO 400
Lens: Tokina 11-16mm

Taken at night and the storm was drifting further offshore so I had use a pretty wide aperture and bump the ISO a bit. Obviously you wanna be careful with this because too much and you’ll blow it out but you’ll get a handle on the balance after a while. I try and keep exposure times down below 20 seconds because I feel like I get better detail from the bolt. There’s not much backing that up… just some weird prejudice I have.

Example 3: Ocean Lightning

Settings: 20s, f/10, ISO 400
Lens: EF-S 18-135mm (shot at 45mm)

This one was shot a bit differently because as this cell was moving offshore I used my stock zoom lens to get tighter on the part of the cell putting down lightning. Narrowed the aperture a bit and it seemed to work out pretty well. I got lucky because it’s tough to get real tight on a cell and get a strike in the frame.

Example 4: Okeechobee Lightning

Settings: 10s, f/10, ISO 200
Lens: Tokina 11-16mm

This strike was huge. This storm was drifting away from me and by this time it was quite far and I wasn’t expecting to get anything else out of it but it put down one last major bolt. Wish I had been closer (maybe) but somehow the settings worked out in my favor as I had left them on what they were set for when the cell was closer to me. It was pretty dark and had a narrow app and low ISO but the strike was so huge and bright it came out okay.

In terms of gear (I shoot on a Rebel T5i) I usually use my 11-16mm or my 17-50mm. The most important piece to me, beyond the obvious, is a shutter release cable. This allows me to set my exposure and lock in the shutter release and let the camera roll. You end up with a ton of shots, but you’re almost guaranteed to get the strike (if you’ve framed it right). You just need to go through and delete like 98% of the unsuccessful shots, but it’s worth it.


About the author: Alex H. Brock is a photography enthusiast based in South Florida. He loves shooting, rocket launches from Cape Canaveral, and the Milky Way. You can find more of his work on Instagram. This article was also published here.