Archivi categoria: southafrica

Famous South African Photographer Found Guilty of Murdering Sex Worker

Well-known South African photographer Zwelethu Mthethwa has been found guilty of murdering a sex worker in a suburb of Cape Town, South Africa, in 2013.

Mthethwa received a Fulbright Scholarship to the Rochester Institute of Technology, where he received his master’s degree in imaging arts in 1989. He is among South Africa’s most famous artists and has had 35 solo exhibitions internationally. His works have been shown at important institutions around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art and the International Centre of Photography, New York; the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and at the Venice Biennale. Mthethwa is represented by Jack Shainman Gallery in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City.

During the trial, the prosecution presented CCTV footage linking Mthethwa to the crime scene. The footage shows the artist’s black Porsche pulling up next to 23-year-old Nokuphila Kumalo. The driver is then seen exiting the car and attacking the young woman. He killed her “by repeatedly kicking her and stomping her body with booted feet,” said the indictment. Mthethwa argued that it was not him in the video‚ and called on “gait” experts to testify that the manner in which the attacker walked did not match his style of walking. However, Judge Patricia Goliath stated in her ruling that the video furnished a “silent witness.”

Women’s rights activists rallied outside the courthouse over the course of the lengthy trial with one placard reading, “Sex workers are not your Art”.

Hugs after the guilty verdict (left), and protesters outside the courtroom (right). Photos by SWEAT.
Photo by SWEAT.

Mthethwa uses environmental portraiture, often taken in quiet domestic settings, to explore the life of migrants, farmers and miners in post-apartheid South Africa. He told PDN that in photographing marginalized South Africans in their homes, “I really wanted to empower the people.”

ArtNet reports that Mthetwas’s bail has been revoked while he awaits sentencing on March 29, 2017.


Image credits: Header photo by SWEAT.

Famous South African Photographer Found Guilty of Murdering Sex Worker

Well-known South African photographer Zwelethu Mthethwa has been found guilty of murdering a sex worker in a suburb of Cape Town, South Africa, in 2013.

Mthethwa received a Fulbright Scholarship to the Rochester Institute of Technology, where he received his master’s degree in imaging arts in 1989. He is among South Africa’s most famous artists and has had 35 solo exhibitions internationally. His works have been shown at important institutions around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art and the International Centre of Photography, New York; the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and at the Venice Biennale. Mthethwa is represented by Jack Shainman Gallery in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City.

During the trial, the prosecution presented CCTV footage linking Mthethwa to the crime scene. The footage shows the artist’s black Porsche pulling up next to 23-year-old Nokuphila Kumalo. The driver is then seen exiting the car and attacking the young woman. He killed her “by repeatedly kicking her and stomping her body with booted feet,” said the indictment. Mthethwa argued that it was not him in the video‚ and called on “gait” experts to testify that the manner in which the attacker walked did not match his style of walking. However, Judge Patricia Goliath stated in her ruling that the video furnished a “silent witness.”

Women’s rights activists rallied outside the courthouse over the course of the lengthy trial with one placard reading, “Sex workers are not your Art”.

Hugs after the guilty verdict (left), and protesters outside the courtroom (right). Photos by SWEAT.
Photo by SWEAT.

Mthethwa uses environmental portraiture, often taken in quiet domestic settings, to explore the life of migrants, farmers and miners in post-apartheid South Africa. He told PDN that in photographing marginalized South Africans in their homes, “I really wanted to empower the people.”

ArtNet reports that Mthetwas’s bail has been revoked while he awaits sentencing on March 29, 2017.


Image credits: Header photo by SWEAT.

Drone Photos Capture the Stark Divide Between Rich and Poor in South Africa

Bloubosrand Kya Sands1

When politicians talk about the gap between the rich and poor or racial divides, they’re usually not being literal. But as Cape Town-based photographer Johnny Miller shows with his startling photo series Unequal Scenes, the gap in South Africa is literal… you just need to get airborne to see it.

Unequal Scenes began as a Facebook post that garnered far more attention than Miller could have anticipated—his drone photo of the Masiphumelele community and its surroundings outside of Cape Town was shared more than 1,000 times, an impressive feat for a photographer with only 1,244 Facebook followers.

Since then, Miller has used his Inspire 1 drone to capture many other, similar photographs and videos across South Africa. His images show the physical divides that separate some ultra-rich neighborhoods from squalid shacks. Sometimes that gap is 200m of wetland; sometimes it includes and electric fence and guardhouse.

“Discrepancies in how people live are sometimes hard to see from the ground. The beauty of being able to fly is to see things from a new perspective – to see things as they really are,” writes Miller. “Looking straight down from a height of several hundred meters, incredible scenes of inequality emerge.” See for yourself:

Some of the communities, says Miller, were “designed with separation in mind.” Others grew “more or less organically.”

What Miller’s photos show is, in essence, the remnants of Apartheid policies that were eliminated 22 years ago. Physical “buffer zones” and other barriers are no longer legally mandated, but as Miller explains, “many of these barriers, and the inequalities they have engendered, still exist.”

Hout Bay Imizamo Yethu

Manenberg Phola Park

Masiphumelele Lake Michelle

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Papwa Sewgolum Golf Course 1

Strand Nomzamo 2

Vukuzenzele Sweet Home

Vusimuzi Mooifontein Cemetery2

Vusimuzi Mooifontein Cemetery3

To see more of Miller’s work, be sure to visit the Unequal Scenes website and follow the project’s Facebook page and Twitter account.

(via Fstoppers)


Image credits: All photos by Johnny Miller/Millefoto and used with permission.

Using Photos to Document the Plight of Vultures, the ‘Antiheroes of Our Ecosystems’

If you want to see a photojournalist who cares deeply about the subject they’re covering, watch this 3-minute National Geographic video. In it, photographer Charlie Hamilton James discusses his photos of vultures — one of the fastest declining families of birds in history, and what James calls “the world’s forgotten environmental disaster.”

James photographed vultures in South Africa from all kinds of perspectives, from placing cameras inside carcasses to shooting the remains of vultures — one of the most trafficked animals in the world — being sold in street markets.

“I have a very big place in my heart for them,” James writes in an article at Nat Geo, which includes a number of his photos. “They are very special creatures, and we need them more than we know.”

Jürgen Schadeberg Talks Leica Cameras and South African Photojournalism

Put together by SixOranges, this four-minute video is an interview with renowned photographer Jürgen Schadeberg. In it, he shares the story behind the collection of Leica cameras he has used throughout his career, many of which were responsible for documenting some of the most iconic photographs of former South African President and icon Nelson Mandela throughout Madiba’s life.

From the M3 through the M9, Schadeberg shares his thoughts on the cameras he’s seen the world through for over six decades, as well as a brief history of how photo publication in South Africa came to be more willing to use 35mm negatives. Whether you’re a film-junkie or just in need of some inspiration, the video is well worth four minutes of your time.

(via Leica Rumors)

David Goldblatt Shares Six Decades Worth of Experience In This Brilliant Video

What does six decades worth of photography experience look and sound like? David Goldblatt. Speaking both to an interviewer and an audience at the 2014 Design Indaba Conference throughout the six-minute video above, Goldblatt takes a look back at the career and some of the resulting images that have brought him so far, giving powerful insights that only time and experience can bestow upon a person.

Coming right out of the gate with a rather humbling piece of knowledge, Goldblatt speaks of his experience separating personal work from client work:

The balance between doing personal work and professional work is a very difficult one. I learnt quite early on that if I was working on a commission my duty was to do photographs that would meet the needs of the client.

If I was doing my own work, it was what was in my head. Quite often that was difficult to reconcile because I would get assignments, perhaps from magazine, which were close to the things that were important to me but that did not mean I was free to do whatever I liked.

Following up, he notes that as time went on, his personal work and professional work intertwined, leaving much of his professional work strewn about with Goldblatt’s personal feelings on it.

GoldblattStill_2

Goldblatt also speaks about some of his experience shooting people and places, both for his professional and personal career. Specifically, he gives an incredibly insightful and intriguing look into the time he was commissioned to photograph Nelson Mandela, not long before he became president of the (then) new Democratic Republic of South Africa.

Much of what Goldblatt shares during the video is well worth turning into a quote you’d like to hang up on your wall for some photo inspiration, but the below phrase he shares in the latter half of the video especially stuck out to me as explaining why it is many of us do what we do:

“Photography has the capacity for recognizing things and bringing them out of obscurity,” he says. “Or out of where they are into another frame so that one looks at it somewhat differently.”

(via Design Indaba via ISO 1200)

The Ends of the Earth, As Seen Through Google Street View

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The advent and continuous expansion of Google Street View has made it possible to explore far off places that we may never be able to visit in person. But where exactly does Google’s reach end? One person deigned to find out.

Inspired in part by the online game GeoGuessr, Alan Taylor over at The Atlantic’s In Focus blog set out to find “the ends of the road” — although, in truth, it’s a lot less philosophical than it might sound.

What he did was spend some serious time on Google Street View, attempting to find the borders of its coverage. At the top we have the end of Google’s ability to follow the Kaimu-Chain of Craters Road in Hawaii. Over time, lava from eruptions of the Kilauea volcano has covered the road and made it impossible to follow any further.

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Both the photo above and below show a southernmost point, although one is much better marked than the other. Above we have the southernmost point buoy in Key West, Florida. Below, the southernmost point of Africa — no, not The Cape of Good Hope, though that’s a common misconception — The Cape Agulhas, South Africa.

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From the south, we go east, to two of the easternmost points on their respective continents. Above is Lighthouse Road, Byron Bay, New South Wales, which is located on Australia’s easternmost shoreline. Below is one of the easternmost points Google has managed to map along Brazil’s Atlantic shoreline.

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Finally, the last two photos we’ll show you here take you in opposite directions. Above, we have a photo of the Chilkat Range, across Lynn Canal from Juneau, Alaska. This point is about as far north of Juneau as Google (or anyone) can drive. And below is a point about as far south as one can go on the South Island of New Zealand.

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These are only a few of the pictures that Taylor collected over the course of his digital travels. To see all 26 “ends of the road” for yourself, be sure to follow the link below to the original In Focus article.

The Ends of the Road [The Atlantic via kottke.org]