Archivi categoria: quicktip

Photoshop Tip: How to Make Eyes ‘Pop’ in 30 Seconds

There’s a simple way to make your subject’s eyes pop in a portrait, and it doesn’t involve touching vibrance, saturation, luminosity, or any other color-based edit. In fact, you can make the full edit in 30 seconds.

This quick Photoshop tip comes to us from photographer Mathieu Stern, who uses a simple sharpening technique to make his subjects’ eyes stand out. Here’s the step by step:

1. Duplicate your background layer (your portrait).

2. Go to Filter > Other > High Pass and apply a High Pass filter with a radius of 10 pixels.

3. Set the layer blend mode to Soft Light

4. Alt+Click on the layer mask icon to create a black layer mask

5. Use a soft brush to pain white over just your subject’s eyes.

That’s it. Done right, the filter will take your subject’s eyes from this:

To this:

Helping them to stand out without that “nuclear eyes” look that so many saturation-obsessed shooters have accidentally created before. Check out the full demo in the video above, and if you like this video, head over to Mathieu’s YouTube channel for more.

5 Simple Tips for Shooting Better Interior Photography

Whether you’re interested in lifestyle photography, real estate imagery, or something in between, knowing how to capture great photos of interiors is a skill all beginners should master. Here are 5 quick tips that’ll help up your interior photography game.

This tutorial was put together by Daniel and Rachel of Mango Street Lab, and like most “tips” videos, these are more like… guidelines. Depending on the mood you’re going for, the client brief, and your own stylistic preferences, you’ll want to adjust these tips accordingly. That said, these 5 guidelines offer a great place to start.

1. Shoot from waist level

Shooting from a standing position will have you looking down on most interior scenes, especially if you’re emphasizing furniture and decor. Shoot from waist level, and use a tripod to make sure you get rock-steady shots from the perfect perspective.

2. Choose your subject and compose accordingly

Many (if not most) interior shoots will feature decor over people, so pick a subject and then compose your shot accordingly. Don’t be afraid to move things around, remove distracting elements, and add (appropriate) touches like books, plants, and/or blankets.

3. Use a wide-angle lens for most shots, and a normal lens for details

This one depends a lot on the client brief or specific shot you’re taking, but most interior shots will be captured with a wide-angle lens (24mm equivalent-ish or wider). The exception is detail shots, which require a closer crop and will be better served by, say, a 50mm equivalent.

4. Use natural light, turn off interior lights, and use a reflector or LED panels for fill

The lighting tips in the video are more specific to Mango Street’s own style. They shoot natural light (usually during the brightest parts of the day) augmented by LED panels or some reflectors to fill in shadows. They also suggest you turn off all of the artificial lights to avoid white balance issues, unless, of course, you need to show off those lighting fixtures.

5. Shoot with a smaller (f/5.6-f/11) aperture to keep everything in focus

Shooting wide open and getting that bokehlicious look is all good and well, but if your goal is to show off a whole room, you’ll want to keep the whole room in focus. Stop down unless you’re shooting detail shots where you want to isolate a smaller subject.


And that’s it. The tips aren’t ground-breaking, but they’ll definitely keep beginners from making some common mistakes, and they can help make interior snapshots look a lot more polished. Check out the video up top to elaborate on each tip, and then head over to the Mango Street Lab YouTube channel for more tutorials and tips videos like this one.

Quick Tip: How to Fold a Reflector in One Easy Motion

Here’s a quick tip that will save every newbie photographer (and probably more than a few intermediate shooters) some agony and embarrassment: how to properly fold a reflector in one easy motion.

The video was created by photographer Jason Lanier, who has seen far too many beginners struggle with this basic chore. “Folding reflectors is one of the most basic and frustrating things for newer photographers to figure out,” reads the description. “All photographers have struggled with this, and Jason took a few moments to show his followers how to easily fold a reflector.”

We realize this is an incredibly basic skill, but it’s one that isn’t taught/demonstrated nearly enough. So if you don’t know how to fold a big rectangular reflector (or a diffuser or a modifier) and you want to find out, give the quick tutorial a look. Even if you do know, it may be worth watching how Lanier does it.

(via ISO 1200)

Lightroom Tip: How to Match Different Photo Exposures in One Click

If you captured a range of exposures for a certain scene, you don’t have to painstakingly adjust each one once you’ve got them in Lightroom. This really useful tip from the folks at Adobe shows you how to do it in a single click.

When you’re out in a challenging lighting environment, it’s tempting to capture a range of different exposures per shot—either because you want to blend exposures or simply because you’re not sure which part of the scene you want to highlight. Once you’re back in Lightroom and you’ve decided on the exposure you like best, don’t go through each photo individually, tweaking exposure until you think you’ve matched it.

Use this quick Lightroom tip instead:

matchexposure_1

Select all of your photos, make sure your active photo is the exposure you want, and then go to Setting > Match Total Exposures (or type Alt+Shift+Command+M). This will intelligently and automatically alter the exposures on all of the photos so they match the active photo.

There you go: a single click to adjust as many photos as you need. For more 60-second Lightroom Coffee Break tips, head over to the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom channel on YouTube.

Lightroom Tip: How to Match Different Photo Exposures in One Click

If you captured a range of exposures for a certain scene, you don’t have to painstakingly adjust each one once you’ve got them in Lightroom. This really useful tip from the folks at Adobe shows you how to do it in a single click.

When you’re out in a challenging lighting environment, it’s tempting to capture a range of different exposures per shot—either because you want to blend exposures or simply because you’re not sure which part of the scene you want to highlight. Once you’re back in Lightroom and you’ve decided on the exposure you like best, don’t go through each photo individually, tweaking exposure until you think you’ve matched it.

Use this quick Lightroom tip instead:

matchexposure_1

Select all of your photos, make sure your active photo is the exposure you want, and then go to Setting > Match Total Exposures (or type Alt+Shift+Command+M). This will intelligently and automatically alter the exposures on all of the photos so they match the active photo.

There you go: a single click to adjust as many photos as you need. For more 60-second Lightroom Coffee Break tips, head over to the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom channel on YouTube.

Lightroom Tip: How to Match Different Photo Exposures in One Click

If you captured a range of exposures for a certain scene, you don’t have to painstakingly adjust each one once you’ve got them in Lightroom. This really useful tip from the folks at Adobe shows you how to do it in a single click.

When you’re out in a challenging lighting environment, it’s tempting to capture a range of different exposures per shot—either because you want to blend exposures or simply because you’re not sure which part of the scene you want to highlight. Once you’re back in Lightroom and you’ve decided on the exposure you like best, don’t go through each photo individually, tweaking exposure until you think you’ve matched it.

Use this quick Lightroom tip instead:

matchexposure_1

Select all of your photos, make sure your active photo is the exposure you want, and then go to Setting > Match Total Exposures (or type Alt+Shift+Command+M). This will intelligently and automatically alter the exposures on all of the photos so they match the active photo.

There you go: a single click to adjust as many photos as you need. For more 60-second Lightroom Coffee Break tips, head over to the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom channel on YouTube.