Archivi categoria: postprocessing

Photoshop Tip: How to Make Eyes ‘Pop’ in 30 Seconds

There’s a simple way to make your subject’s eyes pop in a portrait, and it doesn’t involve touching vibrance, saturation, luminosity, or any other color-based edit. In fact, you can make the full edit in 30 seconds.

This quick Photoshop tip comes to us from photographer Mathieu Stern, who uses a simple sharpening technique to make his subjects’ eyes stand out. Here’s the step by step:

1. Duplicate your background layer (your portrait).

2. Go to Filter > Other > High Pass and apply a High Pass filter with a radius of 10 pixels.

3. Set the layer blend mode to Soft Light

4. Alt+Click on the layer mask icon to create a black layer mask

5. Use a soft brush to pain white over just your subject’s eyes.

That’s it. Done right, the filter will take your subject’s eyes from this:

To this:

Helping them to stand out without that “nuclear eyes” look that so many saturation-obsessed shooters have accidentally created before. Check out the full demo in the video above, and if you like this video, head over to Mathieu’s YouTube channel for more.

How the Tone Curve REALLY Works, and 5 Ways Adobe Could Improve It

The tone curve is one of the most powerful tools in photo editing, allowing you to change multiple values and essentially doing the job of several different adjustment layers. But it’s also complicated, and hard for beginners to understand. These two videos should help.

The first video was shared by Photoshop Tutorials back in December, and it explains how tone curves REALLY work. From adjusting the main RGB curve to breaking down the curve into its Red, Green, and Blue components, the video explains the tone curve, offers some tips on learning how to use it, and shares plenty of examples of different curves in action.

That video alone is worth your time, especially if you still find the tone curve confusing. This next video add to it by suggesting a few design changes Adobe could do to make that would greatly improve the tool.

The video was shared two days ago by Denny Tang, and it attacks the tone curve from a different angle than most tutorials. This is an advice video for Adobe that shows what a major Curves redesign could look like in Lightroom and Photoshop to make the tool much easier to learn and use.

He lists 5 different changes, each of which will help you to better understand how the tone curve works. But even if Adobe pays no attention to Denny’s suggestions, the video will still leave you with a more comprehensive understanding of this powerful photo editing tool.

How to Create a ‘Double Exposure’ Using Photoshop

We love a good in-camera double exposure; done right, they can look as surreal as anything we can create in post. But if you don’t have the skills, expertise, or interest in doing it in-camera, this quick tutorial shows you exactly how to fake the ‘double exposure effect’ in Photoshop.

The video is a bit dated—originally released in May of 2015—but the information and techniques work just as well today as they did a year and a half ago.

In it, Spoon Graphics shows you how to take a clean portrait and combine it with a landscape to create something beautiful and etheral. Going beyond just “this is how you drop a landscape into a portrait,” the video also shows you how to manipulate the image and background to produce the most pleasing final image possible.

No, it’s not a real double exposure—and the purists always bristle at creating something digitally that can be done in-camera—but it’s a technique many a creative would enjoy having in their tool box.