Archivi categoria: Post-Processing

Photoshop Tip: How to Make Eyes ‘Pop’ in 30 Seconds

There’s a simple way to make your subject’s eyes pop in a portrait, and it doesn’t involve touching vibrance, saturation, luminosity, or any other color-based edit. In fact, you can make the full edit in 30 seconds.

This quick Photoshop tip comes to us from photographer Mathieu Stern, who uses a simple sharpening technique to make his subjects’ eyes stand out. Here’s the step by step:

1. Duplicate your background layer (your portrait).

2. Go to Filter > Other > High Pass and apply a High Pass filter with a radius of 10 pixels.

3. Set the layer blend mode to Soft Light

4. Alt+Click on the layer mask icon to create a black layer mask

5. Use a soft brush to pain white over just your subject’s eyes.

That’s it. Done right, the filter will take your subject’s eyes from this:

To this:

Helping them to stand out without that “nuclear eyes” look that so many saturation-obsessed shooters have accidentally created before. Check out the full demo in the video above, and if you like this video, head over to Mathieu’s YouTube channel for more.

Learn Photoshop Tricks in One Minute with Adobe’s ‘Make it Now’ Series

I once read a Quora question that went, “What can I learn in one minute that will be useful for the rest of my life?” I don’t know about the rest of your life, but if you’re a photographer, head over to the Adobe Creative Cloud YouTube channel and check out their ‘Make It Now’ one-minute video tutorials on designing (not retouching) with Photoshop CC.

One of the big problems I have with watching videos on the Web is that, half the time, I get 4 minutes into a 12-minute video that seemed useful before I realize that I was, in fact, totally wrong. There’s another 4 minutes I’m never getting back…

That’s why I love super short tutorial videos like these.

How to Make a Double Exposure

How to Create a Composite

How to Create an Animated GIF

How to Make a Poster from a Template

If you’re new to Photoshop, you may find the video moves too fast for you to keep up; if that’s the case, click on the gear symbol at the bottom right of the screen and select 0.5 speed. Heck, if you want to take notes, go for 0.25 speed.

And that’s it. Congrats! You can now add “Graphic Designer” to your LinkedIn profile! Okay maybe not…

(via Fstoppers)

How the Tone Curve REALLY Works, and 5 Ways Adobe Could Improve It

The tone curve is one of the most powerful tools in photo editing, allowing you to change multiple values and essentially doing the job of several different adjustment layers. But it’s also complicated, and hard for beginners to understand. These two videos should help.

The first video was shared by Photoshop Tutorials back in December, and it explains how tone curves REALLY work. From adjusting the main RGB curve to breaking down the curve into its Red, Green, and Blue components, the video explains the tone curve, offers some tips on learning how to use it, and shares plenty of examples of different curves in action.

That video alone is worth your time, especially if you still find the tone curve confusing. This next video add to it by suggesting a few design changes Adobe could do to make that would greatly improve the tool.

The video was shared two days ago by Denny Tang, and it attacks the tone curve from a different angle than most tutorials. This is an advice video for Adobe that shows what a major Curves redesign could look like in Lightroom and Photoshop to make the tool much easier to learn and use.

He lists 5 different changes, each of which will help you to better understand how the tone curve works. But even if Adobe pays no attention to Denny’s suggestions, the video will still leave you with a more comprehensive understanding of this powerful photo editing tool.

How to Blend 3 Bracketed Exposures for Greater Dynamic Range

Want to learn how to blend 3 bracketed exposures of the same scene to create a single photo with greater dynamic range? Here’s a great 17-minute video tutorial by travel photographer and educator Jimmy McIntyre on how to do so in Photoshop CC.

“In this example we use 3 exposures because the difference between the brightest exposure (also the base exposure) and the darkest exposure is too much,” McIntyre says. “So we bridge the gap by using a middle exposure.”

His technique is a clean, 100% non-destructive workflow. While he shows how easily the job can be done using his own Photoshop plugin, Raya Pro, McIntyre also demonstrates how you can do the same things using ordinary Photoshop.

Things you’ll learn in the tutorial include precision masking and working with smart objects imported directly from Adobe Camera Raw.

(via Shutter Evolve via Reddit)