Archivi categoria: oped

Is Street Photography Killing Itself?

Is the most egalitarian form of photography, ‘street photography’, being destroyed by its own popularity? Is such a thing even possible? I won’t profess to have a clear answer to this question, but I do have some thoughts. Those thoughts may turn into a rant, but I’ll try to contain myself!

Egalitarian = good, right?

This question hits right at the heart of photography and, most specifically, digital photography. If something is easy, more people will do it. The more people doing it, the more ‘cultivated talent’ there will be (which is a good thing). However, there can be a cost: the dross can become overwhelming.

Street photography is easy for everyone to engage in. If you have a camera and are able to access public areas, you can shoot street photography. While this sounds great, I can’t help but feel something of a massacre is taking place. Cameras have become optical machine guns, mowing down everyone and everything with carefree abandon.

The problem, as I see it, is exacerbated by a particular catalyst: for want of a better word, it is ‘cool’. When something is fashionable in this way, the self-image can become the real target, rather than the photograph itself.

So what has ‘coolness’ done for street photography?

It has clouded judgment, that’s what it has done. Some photographers evidently struggle to see past their excitement at indulging in this fountain of cool. Twenty years ago, to pull this off, you had to tote a film camera around and go through all the palava of changing rolls, developing them, faffing with lightboxes, checking contact sheets and making prints. If a person was prepared to go through all of this inglorious hassle, there was a very good chance they were reaching a bit deeper, within and without.

Now, in the digital age, you can buy the right ‘stealth satchel’, blaze away and saturate Instagram and Flickr within hours. At no point in this process will you have to consider the merits of the photographs being taken, because it doesn’t matter. You’re a rock and roll street sniper. At least a landscape photographer has to deal with bad weather, muddy feet and uncooperative light to get his or her shots and that obstacle of effort acts as a filter.

When it’s raining, the street ninja just slides into Starbucks and takes 482 photographs of coffee cups, tables, people’s feet, the window, people walking past the window, people tying their shoe laces… and they’re all painfully boring. Sadly, this garbage is overflowing into the street so to speak. The visible face of popular photography is more and more being defined by street photography, when we’re not being overwhelmed by photos of people’s dinner on social media.

Why could this be bad?

The good street photography is being buried, that’s why. It is more difficult than it should be to find consistently good street photography taken by someone without an already well-known name. The work is out there, I have no doubt of that, but the process of finding it is exhausting and depressing. There also seems to be a bit too much ego in the mix. Far too many of these (often very young) photographers seem unwilling to learn. They’re already amazing, which they know, because that’s what they tell each other continuously on social media. They also have lots of ‘likes’, so that’s that.

On the occasions when I have seen really good photographs on Instagram/Facebook groups, the inspiring work barely gets a mention. Nobody cares. That’s not what social media is about and street photography has become the social media of photography: an avalanche of banal, shallow and unreflective nothing that hasn’t the time to consider its own context. Tell a lie often enough and it becomes the truth. In the same way, much of this ‘great street photography’ is, well, the new great.

Editing. What is that?

Too many street photographers don’t edit. They share everything, perhaps because they think the world wants to know what fifty different takes of groups of random people walking down the street looks like at 8:56 in the morning, on their way into work. I applaud the enthusiasm, but photography is like selling your house. You show the best bits, while trying to avoid scrutiny of the bad bits.

You put your junk into the loft, or carefully pack cupboards. You mow the lawn, give a lick of paint to that beautiful front door and make sure your new kitchen is sparkling. The whole point is to draw attention to the good bits and let them define your house as a proposition. You curate the impression you want to leave people with. What you don’t do is give them a guided tour of the junk pile corner of your garden, the rotten window frame you’ve meant to replace and then hand them a map of the broken floor tiles.

When you’re Magnum Photos, you can put out a book full of contact sheets when most of the photographers who took those hugely iconic images are dead! Everyone else is better off editing at least until it hurts.

Endless juxtapositions and their formulaic brethren

Visual juxtapositions are akin to a trick that can be performed according to recipe. They are cookie cutter photographs that deliver all of their impact (if they have any at all) in no more time than it takes to mentally identify the game. A boot on a poster steps on a passing pedestrian’s head. The man standing at a bus stop is being shouted at by a woman on a billboard.

See, you didn’t even need a photo to experience all that such photographs contain: a simple, boring, endlessly repeated ‘jingle’. You could only ever write one short line about such photographs, because they contain nothing beyond the superficial.

Some photographers have built entire series (in fact entire websites) crammed full of variations of the same thing. They’re no more interesting than ‘zonies’ obsessed with Ansel Adams’ Zone System, who 20 years ago produced endless photographs of tree stumps and sticks that showed how wonderfully they’d applied -3 compensation development. My personal hit list goes something like this:

Juxtapositions. If they say nothing and have no appeal beyond their initial visual recognition, they’re boring. Really boring. Even the ‘good ones’.

Juxtapositions are almost ALL the same. This is a quick screen grab after google searching ‘street photography juxtaposition’.

Random photos of nothing, for no reason, with no content, thought, insight or anything. They’re not so casual as to be cool. They’re just boring.

Faux edginess. People being made to look mean, when they aren’t. Intensity that has been added in Photoshop, or with a pithy title that over-eggs the pudding. Their landscape photography equivalents are the ones shot in Yosemite (or similar) during evidently pleasant weather, that have been heavily over-cooked in post, and then titled ‘_____, Clearing Winter Storm’.

Arrows and street signs. OK, so there is always going to be potential here. Never say never and all that, but I wish I could erase memory of every photo like the one below I have seen and wish I could un-see.

So what do you think about these photographs?

Note: These following street photos are being shared under fair use for commentary and critique. The names of the photographers have been omitted to not single any artist out in a negative way. Anyone who wishes to have their photo removed will have their request respected immediately.

What can you say about this photograph? Is there anything to say?
Posting a letter. Am I missing something?
Waiting for a bus. Is the appeal in her age? If so, where is this going?
The hand/scarf over her face does not make this photo any less banal.
The most overused street photography formula of them all: arrow with person going the wrong way. I don’t see anything here to elevate this image beyond formula.
Is this photo truly compelling because of the black and white theme?
Does this work? If so, why? I see an initial ‘edginess’ replaced by nothing (along with the realization that there isn’t actually an edge)
Everyone hates a mop handle in the eye. Is this an aspirational photo? If so, why? The ‘punchline’ is paper thin.
We see many images like this. Is there supposed to be humour in the sleeping man? Is there something else going on that I am just not seeing?

What goes in comes out

Really engaging photographs are never the product of laziness, or formula, but this does not mean it should be hard work either. “Endeavor” is perhaps the best term. If we put in effort (and some thought) we can generally produce photographs worth more than a quick glance. That does not mean waiting for all of two minutes until a man of the right height walks past a poster depicting a large open mouth. Such photos are simply the free version of buying a ticket to Yosemite and placing your tripod in the exact spot ‘Clearing Winter Storm’ was taken 75 years earlier. It’s easy. It requires no real effort, thought or (most importantly) personal investment.

I am not suggesting a hipster coffee approach here. Riding to the Andes on a unicycle to collect the coffee does not make it taste any different. Working your ass off in photography without that effort actually affecting your photographs is no different. However, just engaging in the subject of photography helps. Learning a little more about yourself helps. Learning about the people and environment around you and your thoughts and reactions to it helps. The sad truth is that most of our effort in photography amounts to nothing. We’ve all worked hard and come back with a slew of entirely disappointing images, but this does not mean we stop trying.

Street photography is fantastic and compelling, but it is also incredibly difficult to do well. In part, this is because we have seen so much of it before. Brilliant, obsessive workaholics have been doing it for 70 years, but they aren’t us. They haven’t had our experiences. They haven’t seen everything through the same eyes. Their insights are not ours. Every single person wielding a camera has the potential to say something interesting, or see something engaging. Again, it comes down to relationships and, even on the street, our relationship with what is in front of the camera is key.

Once a photographer has learned a few ‘tricks’, they are presented with a choice: keep chasing gimmicks or formulas, or look deeper. It’s OK to be lost. It’s OK not to know what you’re doing. It’s OK to fail. It’s absolutely fine to feel insecure about your work. In fact, all of these things are very cool because they state very loudly that a person is trying, striving, exploring and searching in a very personal sense…. call it what you will.

It is this highly individual engagement that makes photography interesting. Street photographs needn’t take that away. It isn’t an altar that photographers must worship beneath and it isn’t a sport either. Some years ago I read a passage in a men’s magazine advising young men not to approach their sexual endeavors in the same way as they might improvements to their sporting performance. And here we are back to the supreme importance of relationships, expression and connection. Without these things, both just become repetitive, predictable acts that lose their luster.


The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author.


About the author: After studying Biological Sciences at Bristol University, Thomas served in the British Army before spending fifteen years living and photographing in conflict zones as a civilian. His work has won numerous international awards and has been exhibited in the UK, US, Europe. You can find more of his work and writing on his website and The Photo Fundamentalist. This article was also published here.

Storytelling in Street Photography

Many street photography tutorials discuss the same topics over and over—focussing techniques, composition, candid shooting, etc. However, I believe that one topic is underrepresented: storytelling.

Many composition principles in street photography are the same as in other kinds of photography. In addition, there needs to be some additional element of interest in the scene as well—an attention grabber. I mentioned in a previous post that, for example, Joel Meyerowitz’s key idea is relations.

In “Life of a Child“, I tried to express this element of relation. In belief, storytelling in street photography is another element of interest often overlooked.

Storytelling in Street Photography

Stories are sometimes subtile and covered by more prominent features, such as light or composition. Sometimes, however, stories are told very strongly, as with the famous picture V-J Day in Times Square by Alfred Eisenstaedt.

This picture is an excellent example of storytelling in street photography, as it is not very emphasized in many composition principles; yet still it has become one of the most iconic street photographs of all times. This can mostly be attributed to the story behind and around the picture that unfolds in the mind of the viewer. I would argue that some of the most famous street photographs have become famous because they tell a strong story and not because of their composition.

Not all stories require much action. In fact, the lack of action in a shot can sometimes open up the storytelling space for the viewer. “Old Man and the Sea 2” tries to achieve exactly this. By omitting the action, the photograph provides more possibilities for interpretation—it is opening up for storylines to unfold.

Photojournalism and Storytelling

Is street photography a form of photojournalism of the everyday life? Can one compose an image by directing the subject? I think there are no right and wrong answers. They will strongly depend on whether one wants to represent undiluted and honest every day life. In fact, as we know from photojournalism, already the framing (what to include, what to leave out), the perspective (from below, from above) the film type etc. represent a selection of the truth—one that the photographer sees and/or want to convey.

The viewer will, in addition, make her own selection and add her own phantasies. The final story imagined is probably a different one than the one shot. I guess, one has to go with what feels right. Most of the time I shoot candidly. But when opportunity arises, and the idea for a story emerges, I might get in touch with the subject and direct her or him. I discuss this in more detail here.

The final image then should on the one hand tell a story, while at the same time leave some space for imagination.

Storytelling Elements

The photographer can play with different storytelling elements. Below, I discuss a few alongside some examples from my portfolio. The list of storytelling elements can by no means be exhaustive but only illustrative, to give photographers some ideas for their own projects.

Key story line – All pictures that contain people contain also story lines. Some are quite clear, others are sidelines. The key story line is of course the prevalent one. The protagonist(s) in a photograph around which other storylines converge.

In the picture above, the two lovers are clearly the protagonists. The others play only a secondary role.

Process or Outcome – One can show a process or one can show the outcome. There are different reasons to pick either of them.

If the process in itself is very interesting (tying shoes isn’t), and one wants the audience not to miss the details in the production process, the former is a good choice. If one picks the outcome, then the process is subsumed. This one the one hand gives the viewer the opportunity to see the product, to tell him or herself the story of what the process might have been. It, however, also opens up the image for more story lines that one is distracted from when the process is in focus.

For example, would I have picked any of the photographs in which the woman in “the comfy shoes” is in the process of tying her shoes, the prominent story would be “ah, she is tying her comfy shoes, her feet must hurt from the high heels”. Picking the ended process, the present image allows other less prominent story lines to come forward: “ah, shoes (check); where is she looking, probably she is watching other people, or is she thinking, she does look very serious; why is she going home alone, oh, she is looking serious, might have to do with that, etc.”

The story that unfolds in the viewer’s head when action is not too dominant can sometimes make a picture with finished processes even more interesting.

Protagonist, antagonist, relationship – Some photographs come to life from the relationship they portray. This could be an antagonistic relationship, a friendship, or simply a correspondence.

Relationships require at least two subjects. But more than two subjects are also possible, of course. The facial expressions can also add to the storyline. For example, in “See Saw” below, the girl in the air is clearly excited and surprised. The lower girl’s expression shows determination.

In order to enhance the tension between the depicted relation, one can look for contrasts and connects in the picture and also in the subjects that one pics.

The two subjects in “Absence” create a tension through many elements: their backs are facing; one is white, one black, and they are dressed in opposite colours. At the same time they are connected through sitting on the same bench and both being immersed in their literature.

Emotions – Happiness, sadness, boredom, anger, frustration, all these emotions make very interesting subjects of a street photograph and add to the storyline. They can be seen as shortcuts of storytelling as emotions immediately unfold in a story. Furthermore, emotions empathically engage the viewer (much more than nondescript expressions of random shots of pedestrians).

Archetypes, virtues and vices represent some of the most prominent storytelling elements. The last picture illustrates motherhood, for example. In addition, we have the girl’s courage and curiosity. Particularly journalism photography centres around archetypes, virtues, and vices, as they are universally recognisable and have a strong effect on the viewer.

For example, Joe Rosenthal’s 1945 “Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” or “Tank Man” on Tiananmen Square in 1989 both portray heroism; however, in totally different ways.

These storytelling elements are merely a few examples. The list of elements is endless. Keeping the storytelling element in mind certainly helps selecting the more interesting photographs from your contact sheet. If keeping storytelling in mind, a street photography project can become the more interesting for both the photographer and the reader.

I believe that in the end, all photography is storytelling. Some stories are boring and some are exciting and engaging. A good storyteller tells the exciting and engaging ones.


About the author: Andrej Zwitter is an amateur photographer based in the Netherlands. He shoots a diverse range of styles, but believes that street photography in particular lays bare the soul of the photographer. To see more of his work on his blog. This article also appeared here.

Storytelling in Street Photography

Many street photography tutorials discuss the same topics over and over—focussing techniques, composition, candid shooting, etc. However, I believe that one topic is underrepresented: storytelling.

Many composition principles in street photography are the same as in other kinds of photography. In addition, there needs to be some additional element of interest in the scene as well—an attention grabber. I mentioned in a previous post that, for example, Joel Meyerowitz’s key idea is relations.

In “Life of a Child“, I tried to express this element of relation. In belief, storytelling in street photography is another element of interest often overlooked.

Storytelling in Street Photography

Stories are sometimes subtile and covered by more prominent features, such as light or composition. Sometimes, however, stories are told very strongly, as with the famous picture V-J Day in Times Square by Alfred Eisenstaedt.

This picture is an excellent example of storytelling in street photography, as it is not very emphasized in many composition principles; yet still it has become one of the most iconic street photographs of all times. This can mostly be attributed to the story behind and around the picture that unfolds in the mind of the viewer. I would argue that some of the most famous street photographs have become famous because they tell a strong story and not because of their composition.

Not all stories require much action. In fact, the lack of action in a shot can sometimes open up the storytelling space for the viewer. “Old Man and the Sea 2” tries to achieve exactly this. By omitting the action, the photograph provides more possibilities for interpretation—it is opening up for storylines to unfold.

Photojournalism and Storytelling

Is street photography a form of photojournalism of the everyday life? Can one compose an image by directing the subject? I think there are no right and wrong answers. They will strongly depend on whether one wants to represent undiluted and honest every day life. In fact, as we know from photojournalism, already the framing (what to include, what to leave out), the perspective (from below, from above) the film type etc. represent a selection of the truth—one that the photographer sees and/or want to convey.

The viewer will, in addition, make her own selection and add her own phantasies. The final story imagined is probably a different one than the one shot. I guess, one has to go with what feels right. Most of the time I shoot candidly. But when opportunity arises, and the idea for a story emerges, I might get in touch with the subject and direct her or him. I discuss this in more detail here.

The final image then should on the one hand tell a story, while at the same time leave some space for imagination.

Storytelling Elements

The photographer can play with different storytelling elements. Below, I discuss a few alongside some examples from my portfolio. The list of storytelling elements can by no means be exhaustive but only illustrative, to give photographers some ideas for their own projects.

Key story line – All pictures that contain people contain also story lines. Some are quite clear, others are sidelines. The key story line is of course the prevalent one. The protagonist(s) in a photograph around which other storylines converge.

In the picture above, the two lovers are clearly the protagonists. The others play only a secondary role.

Process or Outcome – One can show a process or one can show the outcome. There are different reasons to pick either of them.

If the process in itself is very interesting (tying shoes isn’t), and one wants the audience not to miss the details in the production process, the former is a good choice. If one picks the outcome, then the process is subsumed. This one the one hand gives the viewer the opportunity to see the product, to tell him or herself the story of what the process might have been. It, however, also opens up the image for more story lines that one is distracted from when the process is in focus.

For example, would I have picked any of the photographs in which the woman in “the comfy shoes” is in the process of tying her shoes, the prominent story would be “ah, she is tying her comfy shoes, her feet must hurt from the high heels”. Picking the ended process, the present image allows other less prominent story lines to come forward: “ah, shoes (check); where is she looking, probably she is watching other people, or is she thinking, she does look very serious; why is she going home alone, oh, she is looking serious, might have to do with that, etc.”

The story that unfolds in the viewer’s head when action is not too dominant can sometimes make a picture with finished processes even more interesting.

Protagonist, antagonist, relationship – Some photographs come to life from the relationship they portray. This could be an antagonistic relationship, a friendship, or simply a correspondence.

Relationships require at least two subjects. But more than two subjects are also possible, of course. The facial expressions can also add to the storyline. For example, in “See Saw” below, the girl in the air is clearly excited and surprised. The lower girl’s expression shows determination.

In order to enhance the tension between the depicted relation, one can look for contrasts and connects in the picture and also in the subjects that one pics.

The two subjects in “Absence” create a tension through many elements: their backs are facing; one is white, one black, and they are dressed in opposite colours. At the same time they are connected through sitting on the same bench and both being immersed in their literature.

Emotions – Happiness, sadness, boredom, anger, frustration, all these emotions make very interesting subjects of a street photograph and add to the storyline. They can be seen as shortcuts of storytelling as emotions immediately unfold in a story. Furthermore, emotions empathically engage the viewer (much more than nondescript expressions of random shots of pedestrians).

Archetypes, virtues and vices represent some of the most prominent storytelling elements. The last picture illustrates motherhood, for example. In addition, we have the girl’s courage and curiosity. Particularly journalism photography centres around archetypes, virtues, and vices, as they are universally recognisable and have a strong effect on the viewer.

For example, Joe Rosenthal’s 1945 “Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” or “Tank Man” on Tiananmen Square in 1989 both portray heroism; however, in totally different ways.

These storytelling elements are merely a few examples. The list of elements is endless. Keeping the storytelling element in mind certainly helps selecting the more interesting photographs from your contact sheet. If keeping storytelling in mind, a street photography project can become the more interesting for both the photographer and the reader.

I believe that in the end, all photography is storytelling. Some stories are boring and some are exciting and engaging. A good storyteller tells the exciting and engaging ones.


About the author: Andrej Zwitter is an amateur photographer based in the Netherlands. He shoots a diverse range of styles, but believes that street photography in particular lays bare the soul of the photographer. To see more of his work on his blog. This article also appeared here.

Fetishizing an Entire Culture Through Photography

In September 2016, Vogue España featured Kendall Jenner in a ballet-themed photo shoot. The ballet community was up in arms over the “ballet appropriation” and disregard for the years of training that goes into being a ballet dancer. Jenner responded by explaining that “ I didn’t even know I was going to be a ballerina until I went into hair and makeup.”

Spanish Vogue by @miguelreveriego

A post shared by Kendall (@kendalljenner) on

Fashion photography has always had an element of the fantastical and aspirational. Fashion itself tends to be very appropriative. Case in point: Kellyanne Conway’s Gucci-designed Inauguration outfit. No offense to professional dancers, but this was much ado about nothing.

Ado About Something

For Vogue’s March issue – ironically their “diversity” issue – model Karli Kloss was photographed by Swedish photographer Mikael Jansson in a piece called “Spirited Away,” an allusion to Hayao Miyazaki’s classic animation. My newsfeed was dotted with cries of cultural appropriation. I didn’t understand the fuss because the first image I saw looked lovely.


A white model wearing a kimono is no different than a non-Indian wearing a Nehru collar. They are pieces of clothing that have been adopted into individuals’ wardrobes.

But upon closer inspection of the essay, it was clear that Kloss was made up as a geisha (and referred to as a geisha in the essay) – a deeply misunderstood role in historical Japan that most westerners incorrectly equate with a prostitute.

So the blonde Chicagoan donned a black wig and was styled with make-up to make her appear asian while playing the role of a sexualized exotic. Let’s not forget using an asian man as a prop – it’s gotta be a sumo wrestler or a ninja, right? This isn’t the case where a model pretends to be a ballerina, mermaid, or construction worker. This is using photography to reinforce a detrimental narrative. And for what? To sell clothes and perfume. (Kloss did apologize.)

We can’t eschew nuance and claim that this is no different than the Jenner case. It’s a false equivalent because as a professor friend of mine pointed out, “We continue to reinforce the narrative of otherness (e.g., Asian women as exotic geisha dolls, black youths as overly sexual thugs) that then feeds into the systemic racial inequality that pervades US society. These are not isolated examples, but have a long and tenacious history.”

I’ve been traveling in Tokyo for the past two weeks. In a city of 13 million people, I’ve seen two women in kimonos and two sumo wrestlers on bicycles. Photographers wield the power to depict people and cultures in ways that either reinforce or dispel stereotypes. Use it wisely.

(If you really want to photograph geishas, then pursue the project on your dime, fight for access, and be one of the few people to ever photograph them behind the scenes.)


About the author: Allen Murabayashi is the Chairman and co-founder of PhotoShelter, which regularly publishes resources for photographers. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. Allen is a graduate of Yale University, and flosses daily. This article was also published here.

Low-Cost Photography, or: The Slow Death of the Industry

My name is Benoit Florençon, and I’m a photographer based in Paris. I was recently approached by Kodakit, an entity of Kodak, which promises photographers regular jobs with big companies in exchange for extremely low pay.

I agreed to meet with their CEO and their photographer community manager a few days ago to discuss what they had to offer.

I ended up deciding to decline the offer and wrote them an email I’d like to share here, to both warn unaware photographers of such practices and to spark the debate on how to protect ourselves better.

Below is my email response to them:


Dear [PERSON ONE], dear [PERSON TWO]

I’m choosing to email you back in English so that you can share my thoughts with whoever you think is relevant.

First of all, I would like to thank you for inviting me over to the Kodakit presentation. It was an interesting experience to meet you both. I will, however, have to decline your offer to be part of the Kodakit adventure for the following reasons.

I believe that client communication is as important as a brief and a budget, and it is what makes a relation trustworthy, an assignment successful, and a business partnership grow forward. Photographers are not just trigger fingers, clients are not just bank transfers, and reducing all that to a text message sent by an algorithm is not the best way to value anyone’s work.

[PERSON ONE], [PERSON TWO], both of you mentioned Uber during the meeting, saying that your model was based on the same concept. I would like to correct this notion: Uber, as well as Airbnb, invite folks of all walks of life to become “taxi drivers” or “hosts”. Both those models are based on extremely common set of skills, all of us here could be Uber drivers if we wanted to. Kodakit on the other hand, invites professionals to work on jobs that require a decent amount of skills and gear, but still drives low wages, loss of copyrights, and disproportionate assignments in the name of recurring work.

No, [PERSON TWO], I cannot lower the quality of my work to meet lower expectations. I haven’t practiced for years, invested thousands of euros in gear, and sharpened my skills over hundreds of hours of shooting and editing to be able to simply “forget” how to take a good photo when I start shooting. Ask [PERSON ONE] if on a job, he could forget his years of experience to wilfully, say, create an unsuccessful company, or knowingly release an app that is sub-standards; I don’t think such a switch exists.

The issue I have is that you are asking for a lot, and giving very little in return. You are asking pros to work in very non professional conditions. I’m not worried for Kodakit though, a lot of photographers will happily sign up and make money in the short term, not seeing the big picture (no pun intended). In the long run though, I’m afraid you will be a threat to the survival my industry, and the very job I cherish. I’m still impressed by the numbers about the photography market you quoted during the meeting. Out of all of this money, you can really only negotiate with [THE CLIENT] $250 USD per shoot for your photographers?

You want to be beneficial to the photography industry? You want to be respected by professional photographers and give hope to beginners? You really want to do something to make photographers’ and their clients’ lives a better one? Let’s talk. I have plenty of ideas who would make a lot of sense, shine your household name all over the industry and make everyone happy. So far you’re not helping the industry, you’re leeching off it and giving minuscule drops to the very people your survival depends on.

Thank you for taking the time to read me. My short answer would have been: my gear and skills are not adapted to your needs. Looking forward to an answer if you deem it necessary. But either way please delete my account from Kodakit as I couldn’t find the option to do it myself in the interface.

Kind regards,

Benoit Florençon


I have plenty more arguments that I didn’t include in this email because I didn’t think they would be pertinent to them. What motivated me to share it here is the answer I got from them, when I had left some room for dialogue:


Hi Benoit,

Thanks for taking the time to giving us feedback . Fully appreciate your perspective and understand your point of view.

We will remove you from the list.

Best Regards,

[PERSON ONE]


About the author: Benoit Florençon is a French photographer based in Paris who spent a decade in Shanghai. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. You can find his work on his website, Behance, Instagram, and Facebook.