Archivi categoria: lens

This is the Power of Sigma’s $60 Lens Dock for Fixing Focus

Sigma’s Art series of lenses are already praised for their image quality and sharpness, but you can hone that sharpness even more by adjusting the focus of your lens using Sigma’s USB Dock. Photographer Kyle Kozinski recently discovered just how much of a difference it can make.

Kozinski noticed that his $799 Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 Art lens was slightly off in its focusing, so he shelled out $60 for a Sigma USB Dock.

“Everything up to close to infinity was front focusing and then at infinity it was back focusing,” Kozinski writes. After calibrating his lens’ focus with the USB Dock and Sigma Optimization Pro software, Kozinski saw a night and day difference.

Here are two 100% crops from photos shot with the lens before and after calibrating the focus:

As you can see, the lens now focuses correctly on the text found on the side of the drill driver instead of slightly toward the front or back. This tight, accurate focus is especially helpful for things like shooting portraits with a very shallow depth of field, when you want to ensure that your subject’s eyes are tack sharp.

Many modern digital cameras feature a AF Microadjustment feature for fixing similar focusing issues, but Sigma’s system goes a step beyond.

“The dock allows multiple adjustment values over different focal lengths and focusing ranges whereas the micro adjustment is the same value for everything,” Kozinski explains.

You can find more of Kozinski’s work on his website, Facebook, and Instagram.


Image credits: Comparison photos by Kyle Kozinski and used with permission

Meyer-Optik Unveils a 35mm f/2.8 to Complete the Trioplan Trilogy

The lens brand Meyer-Optik-Goerlitz has just unveiled a new 35mm f/2.8 “storyteller” lens. Called the Trioplan 35+, it’s the 3rd and final lens in the rebooted Trioplan trilogy following the 100mm f/2.8 and 50mm f/2.9.

As with the earlier two new Trioplan lenses, the new Trioplan 35+ exhibits the classic “soap bubble bokeh” look in out-of-focus areas of the frame. It’s the first time this special bokeh look is appearing in a wide-angle lens.

It was previously thought that the soap bubble effect was too difficult to achieve in a wide-angle lens, Meyer-Optic says, but its engineers figured out how to add two elements to the historic Cook Triplet lens design to “boost” the lens. These extra elements are also why the name of the lens as a “+” in it.

The new Trioplan 35+ is geared toward street and documentary photographers who wish to tell stories with their photos. Like its two older siblings, the new 35+ is a high-quality, hand-crafted, manual-focus lens. Specs include an angle of view of 31.5°, a minimum focusing distance of 0.3m (~1ft), 12 aperture blades, and a weight of 220g (~7.8oz).

Here are some sample photos captured using the lens:

Also like its predecessors, the 35+ is being launched through a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter, where Meyer-Optik has already successfully raised over $1.8 million to jump-start its prior lens projects.

A pledge of $649 or more will allow you to secure a first copy of this lens in most major camera mounts (i.e. Canon EF, Nikon F, Sony E, Fuji X, MFT, M42, Pentax K, and Leica M/L) in late 2017 if the company delivers on this campaign. So far, it has already raised more than $170,000, blowing past its original funding goal of $50,000.

Meyer-Optik Unveils a 35mm f/2.8 to Complete the Trioplan Trilogy

The lens brand Meyer-Optik-Goerlitz has just unveiled a new 35mm f/2.8 “storyteller” lens. Called the Trioplan 35+, it’s the 3rd and final lens in the rebooted Trioplan trilogy following the 100mm f/2.8 and 50mm f/2.9.

As with the earlier two new Trioplan lenses, the new Trioplan 35+ exhibits the classic “soap bubble bokeh” look in out-of-focus areas of the frame. It’s the first time this special bokeh look is appearing in a wide-angle lens.

It was previously thought that the soap bubble effect was too difficult to achieve in a wide-angle lens, Meyer-Optic says, but its engineers figured out how to add two elements to the historic Cook Triplet lens design to “boost” the lens. These extra elements are also why the name of the lens as a “+” in it.

The new Trioplan 35+ is geared toward street and documentary photographers who wish to tell stories with their photos. Like its two older siblings, the new 35+ is a high-quality, hand-crafted, manual-focus lens. Specs include an angle of view of 31.5°, a minimum focusing distance of 0.3m (~1ft), 12 aperture blades, and a weight of 220g (~7.8oz).

Here are some sample photos captured using the lens:

Also like its predecessors, the 35+ is being launched through a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter, where Meyer-Optik has already successfully raised over $1.8 million to jump-start its prior lens projects.

A pledge of $649 or more will allow you to secure a first copy of this lens in most major camera mounts (i.e. Canon EF, Nikon F, Sony E, Fuji X, MFT, M42, Pentax K, and Leica M/L) in late 2017 if the company delivers on this campaign. So far, it has already raised more than $170,000, blowing past its original funding goal of $50,000.

Yongnuo 85mm f/1.8 Review: Half the Price of the Canon… for Good Reason

Yongnuo has been making decent Canon knockoffs for a while now, so when it was discovered that an 85mm f/1.8 Canon clone was in the works, we got excited. Now, we get to find out if the Yongnuo, at half the price of its Canon counterpart, can keep up.

YouTuber Christopher Frost gives us a great overview of the brand new Yongnuo lens in his most recent review, and the verdict is not a surprise.

The short answer to the question “Can it keep up?” is “No.” But you already knew that. At half the price of Canon’s surprisingly sharp 85mm f/1.8 USM (~$200 vs Canon’s ~$400), nobody was expecting an identical lens in every regard. So the question becomes, “Where does the Yongnuo version fall short?”

First, the good. Build quality—a combination of metal mount/filter threads, plastic parts in the middle, and a rubberized focus ring—is actually great for the price. And when it comes to optical quality, the lens holds it own pretty well against the Canon. It’s softer in the corners wide-open, but the difference is gone by the time you hit f/4.

So where did Yongnuo cut corners and save you that $200? Mainly Autofocus. On an SLR, the focus was accurate, but it’s noticeably slower than the Canon and so noisy you might want to consider buying a good pair of earplugs. It reminds me of my first Canon Nifty Fifty… except louder.

Finally, one last (and very major) drawback is that Frost couldn’t get it to work with his Canon EOS-M mirrorless camera. If he tried to stop the lens down past f/2.8, the camera would simply lock up. Of course, this is one camera and one third-party adapter combination, but mirrorless shooters probably won’t want to risk buying a dud.

Overall, the Yongnuo lens doesn’t stray far from the “you get what you pay for” cliché.

If you shoot only stills, shoot only on an SLR (not mirrorless), don’t mind the slower noisy autofocus, and aren’t pixel peeping the corners of all your wide-open shots, save $200 and be on your merry way. But if you’re concerned about any of the things mentioned above, try to find a good used version of Canon’s 85mm f/1.8 USM instead.