Archivi categoria: diorama

Famous Photographs Recreated in Miniature Sets on a Tabletop

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When Switzerland-based photographers Joakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger have some down time between projects, they work on an ambitious photo project of their own. Since 2012, the duo has been recreating some of the most iconic photos captured throughout history… as miniature tabletop dioramas.

The duo started their Icons project with a recreation of “Rhein II,” the photograph by Andreas Gursky that sold for $4.3 million back in 2011, becoming the world’s most expensive photograph.

Here’s the miniature version they created followed by the original photo it was based on by Andreas Gursky:

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After deciding on which shot to recreate, Cortis and Sonderegger collect the materials they need to make the scene look realistic. Things like model cars and airplanes, cement, paper, cotton balls, and more.

Each recreation is highly detailed and extremely faithful to the original shot. Projects take from 1-2 days up to 2-3 weeks to complete, depending on the complexity of the original photo.

Here are photographs in the series so far, followed by the famous images they were made to look like:

The world’s first photo by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce

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Abu Ghraib photo by an unknown US soldier

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Mont Blanc by Louis-Auguste Bisson & Auguste-Rosalie Bisson

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The crash of the Concorde by Toshihiko Sato

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Hindenberg disaster at Lakehurst by Sam Shere

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The atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki by Charles Levy

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Footstep on the moon by Edwin Aldrin

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Munich massacre by Ludwig Wegmann

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Hoax photo of the Loch Ness monster

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The Battle of Broodseinde by Ernest Brooks

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Tankman on Tiananmen Square by Stuart Franklin

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The Wright Brothers’ first flight John Thomas Daniels

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Cortis and Sonderegger say that this is an ongoing project, and that they hope to publish the photographs as a book in the future.

(via Wired and Birds in Flight)

Incredibly Detailed Diorama Photos of Urban Decay and War-Torn City Streets

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Tokyo-based artist Satoshi Araki is a man whose eye for the detail is immediately evident when you look at his dioramas… if you can even tell they’re dioramas, that is.

For each miniature, Araki painstakingly plans out the layout of his trashed and scattered street scenes and photographs in such a way that, often, you’d be hard-pressed to identify them as dioramas at all..

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The 45-year-old artist makes a living by crafting many of the items seen in the scenes he photographs, but in his free time, he enjoys putting his skills to use creating photographs of urban decay and war-torn streets.

Araki uses a variety of materials to create the lifelike scenes — from styrofoam to die-cast cars — sculpting and painting them to perfection. When he needs ideas, he says a simple Google image search gets the job done, providing him with enough visual inspiration to bring the pieces of plastic and styrofoam to life.

From miniature newspapers to Coke cans with Arabic branding, the meticulous nature of his work is truly impressive. Here are a set of images of his dioramas, as well as some behind the scenes images for scale:

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To keep up with Araki and his work, visit his website or follow him on Facebook.

(via Laughing Squid)


Image credits: Photographs by Satoshi Araki and used with permission

Handmade Diorama Maps Created Using Thousands of Printed Photos

Handmade Diorama Maps Created Using Thousands of Printed Photos diorama paris copy

What you see above is a “map” of Paris created by collaging thousands of photographs shot in the city. It’s just one of the amazing pieces in Japanese photographer Sohei Nishino‘s Diorama Map project. The series contains maps of many of the world’s most famous cities, and all of them are photographed and collaged by hand.

To create each diorama map, Nishino visits a city and shoots thousands of photographs while walking around within them. His goal is to capture his personal memory of traveling around that city, and this stage often takes weeks — or even months.

Hundreds of rolls of black-and-white film and tens of thousands of photographs later, he develops and prints the film himself in a personal darkroom, brings everything into his studio, and then begins to edit them. He selects thousands of photographs that are representative of what he would like to show, and then sets to work creating a collage.

Using a sketch of the city’s layout on a giant white canvas, he spends months cutting photographs and gluing them onto the map in the locations they belong. The maps are not meant to be accurate recreations of exactly what a city looks like from above, but are instead more representative of his personal memory and experiences.

The process is tedious, but Nishino still manages to produce them at a rate of about three per year.

Here are some of the diorama maps he has created so far:

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Berlin, Germany

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Tokyo, Japan

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Shanghai, China

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Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

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New York City, New York

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London, England

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Jerusalem, Israel

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Istanbul, Turkey

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Hong Kong, China

Here are a couple of time-lapse videos showing Nishino creating one of his diorama maps:

You can see more diorama maps and more of Nishino’s work over on his website.

Diorama Maps by Sohei Nishino (via POTB)


Image credits: Photographs by Sohei Nishino and used with permission

Photographs of Real People Living Inside Tiny Cardboard Box Dioramas

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Some photographers have made names for themselves by creating and photographing extremely detailed dioramas: miniature tabletop scenes that are so realistic that viewers often mistake them for the real world. Belgian photographers Maxime Delvaux and Kevin Laloux of 354 Photographers have put an interesting spin on the diorama photo concept by Photoshopping real people into their miniature scenes. The series is titled “Box“.

Each of the scenes tells a dark and dreary story, and was built over the course of a few days inside a cardboard box.

As with other photo projects we’ve featured in which perspective is important, Delvaux and Laloux arranged the diorama’s objects while looking through the viewfinder of a fixed camera.

Once they’ve finalized what the diorama will look like, the next step in the challenge is to photograph the human subjects in a way that blends in seamlessly with the scene. They pay careful attention to position and lighting while photographing each person, and then carefully composite them into the diorama using Photoshop.

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Wired’s Raw File has an article about the project in which the two photographers share a little about its history and challenges.

Box by 354 Photographers (via Wired)


Image credits: Photographs by Maxime Delvaux and Kevin Laloux, and used with permission


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A Behind-the-Scenes Glimpse of Matthew Albanese’s Magical Miniature Worlds

A Behind the Scenes Glimpse of Matthew Albaneses Magical Miniature Worlds worlds

We first featured photographer Matthew Albanese’s Strange Worlds project back in 2010, not too long after the project’s inception. His amazing images appear to show beautiful outdoor scenes, but were actually shot on a tabletop in his studio. He creates extremely detailed dioramas that take months to complete, and then uses various photographic techniques to make the scene look like the real world. It’s like the opposite of using tilt-shift lenses to turn the world into a miniature model.

While we shared some of his final works last time, this time we’re showing glimpses of how those photographs were made. Each final work will be preceded by one or more photographs showing a behind-the-scenes look of the same scene.

Fields, After the Storm

This model is simply made out of faux fur(fields), cotton (clouds) and sifted tile grout(mountains). The perspective is forced as in all of my images, and the lighting effect was created by simply shifting the white balance [...] Faux Fur was used to create the texture of flowing waves of grain. The sunset was achieved by shifting the white balance with the addition of colored gels. Cotton, canvas and mixed light temperatures create a sunset.

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Tornado

Tornado made of steel wool, cotton, ground parsley and moss

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Wildfire

Diorama made from wood, moss, yellow glitter, clear garbage bags, cooked sugar, scotch-brite pot scrubbers, bottle brushes, clipping from a bush in bloom (white flowers) clear thread, sand, tile grout (coloring), wire, paper and alternating yellow, red and orange party bulbs [...] Most of the trees were suspended at different heights to enhance the destructive illusion of the fire.

The fire effect was created by beaming colored party bulbs through a clear garbage bag.

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Aurora Borealis

This one was made by photographing a beam of colored light against a black curtain to achieve the edge effect. The trees were composited from life (so far the only real life element in any of these images) The stars are simply strobe light through holes in cork board [...] a cork-board with holes punched through it. Strobes were fired from behind to create bursts of starry light.

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Icebreaker

25 pounds of sugar cooked at varying temperatures (hard crack & pulled sugar recipes) It’s basically made out of candy. salt, egg whites, corn syrup, cream of tartar, powdered sugar, blue food coloring, india ink & flour. Three days of cooking, and two weeks of building [...] Each icicle was shaped and applied by hand. Dough was sculpted to look like a glacier ridge.

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DIY Paradise

Cotton, salt, cooked sugar, tin foil, feathers & canvas. Clouds are cotton balls shot from below through glass. The surface of the ocean made of cooked sugar poured on top of crinkled foil.

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Everything We Ever Were

It took two months to store up enough fireplace ash to create this lunar landscape. The darker rocks are made of mixed tile grout, flag crumpled paper & wire. The Earth is a video still projected onto the wall. Inspired by the Apollo 11 mission.

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Salt Water Falls

Model made out of glass, plexiglass, tile grout, moss, twigs, salt, painted canvas & dry ice. The waterfall was created from a time exposure of falling table salt.

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Breaking Point

Volcano made out of tile grout, cotton, phosphorous ink. this model volcano was illuminated from within by 6-60 watt light bulbs. The explosion of lava was sampled from a picture I took of fireworks (the only composited element).

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How to Breathe Underwater

Diorama made out of walnuts, poured and cast candle wax, wire, glitter, peanut shells, flock, plaster, wire, dyed starfish, compressed moss, jellybeans (anemones), sponges, wax coated seashells, toothpaste, clay, figs, feathers, Q-tips, nonpareils. Surface of the water was created using vinyl shower curtain, plexiglass and clear epoxy. The reflected sunlight effect was created using a video projector through fake fog. The white balance was set for tungsten allowing the sunlight to appear bright and clear while the strobes provided a deep blue shift in the fill light regions. The lens was covered with a piece of blue stretch wrap which created subtle distortions throughout the image. A total of 11 light sources were used including the projector.

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New Life #1 and New Life #2

Diorama made using painted parchment paper, thread, hand dyed ostrich feathers, carved chocolate, wire, raffia, masking tape, coffee, synthetic potting moss and cotton. Inside of the willow tree made mostly from thread and ostrich feathers. The tree took over two months of construction time. Cotton batting dyed green was used to prevent too much light from passing through during the shooting process.

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You can see Albanese’s entire collection of Strange Worlds photographs here, and many more behind-the-scenes photographs here and here.

Modeling My Worlds by Matthew Albanese [Behance via Feature Shoot via Fstoppers]


Image credits: Photographs by Matthew Albanese