Archivi categoria: diorama

Photos of People’s Heads in Miniature Models of Famous Galleries

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Put Your Head Into Gallery,” is an unusual interactive art project by Tbilisi, Georgia-based artist Tezi Gabunia. After creating realistic small-scale models of famous rooms in art galleries, Gabunia and his collaborators put them on display and invited visitors to his exhibition to pose with their heads inside the tiny spaces. The resulting photos show giant heads peering into well-known art galleries.

Mini replicas were made of the following four spaces: Saatchi Gallery (Tezi Gabunia), The Louvre (Rubens), Tate Modern (Hirst), and Gagosian Gallery (Liechtenstein). The models were created with laser cutting and consisted of PVC, plexiglass, wooden paper, and glue.

“The project also involves exhibitions of different artists in above-mentioned spaces,” Gabunia writes. “Transportable feature of the models makes these galleries accessible for everyone. Moreover, anyone can look into gallery, take a photo and become an exhibit.”

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Here’s a behind-the-scenes video showing visitors lining up to have their face photos taken inside the little galleries:

Here are some of the photos that resulted (you can find the complete albums here and here):

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(via Tezi Gabunia via Laughing Squid)


Credits: Concept by Tezi Gabunia, Ucha Urushadze, Nika Maisuradze, Dato Tsanava. Photography by Andro Eradze, Saba Shengelia, Chipo Pelicano, Giorgi Machavariani, and Ani Beridze.

This Guy Made a Miniature 1900s Photo Studio

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Want to see what photo studios were like a century ago? Turkish artist Ali Alamedy recently spent 9 months building a 1900s photo studio… as a miniature tabletop diorama.

The model shows an era in which photographers were largely limited to using natural light from the sun shining in through the translucent ceiling.

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As you can see, the miniature studio is extremely detailed. Alamedy created everything from scratch using various materials (mostly wood, copper, and paper). He faithfully recreated over 100 miniature objects for the space, from tiny large format cameras to the frames and photos on the walls.


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“There were lots of challenges, especially when I was doing the research,” Alamedy writes. “I could find only few pictures from old studios all in white and black.”

In addition to referencing the old photos of old photo studios, Alamedy also researched the state of photography of the time to find out how photographers operated and what tools and techniques they used. The extensive research allowed Alamedy to faithfully recreate the look and feel of the early days of photography.

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You can find more of Alamedy’s work on Facebook, Instagram, and Behance.

(via DIYP via Bored Panda)

Famous Photographs Recreated in Miniature Sets on a Tabletop

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When Switzerland-based photographers Joakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger have some down time between projects, they work on an ambitious photo project of their own. Since 2012, the duo has been recreating some of the most iconic photos captured throughout history… as miniature tabletop dioramas.

The duo started their Icons project with a recreation of “Rhein II,” the photograph by Andreas Gursky that sold for $4.3 million back in 2011, becoming the world’s most expensive photograph.

Here’s the miniature version they created followed by the original photo it was based on by Andreas Gursky:

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After deciding on which shot to recreate, Cortis and Sonderegger collect the materials they need to make the scene look realistic. Things like model cars and airplanes, cement, paper, cotton balls, and more.

Each recreation is highly detailed and extremely faithful to the original shot. Projects take from 1-2 days up to 2-3 weeks to complete, depending on the complexity of the original photo.

Here are photographs in the series so far, followed by the famous images they were made to look like:

The world’s first photo by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce

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Abu Ghraib photo by an unknown US soldier

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Mont Blanc by Louis-Auguste Bisson & Auguste-Rosalie Bisson

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The crash of the Concorde by Toshihiko Sato

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Hindenberg disaster at Lakehurst by Sam Shere

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The atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki by Charles Levy

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Footstep on the moon by Edwin Aldrin

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Munich massacre by Ludwig Wegmann

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Hoax photo of the Loch Ness monster

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The Battle of Broodseinde by Ernest Brooks

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Tankman on Tiananmen Square by Stuart Franklin

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The Wright Brothers’ first flight John Thomas Daniels

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Cortis and Sonderegger say that this is an ongoing project, and that they hope to publish the photographs as a book in the future.

(via Wired and Birds in Flight)

Incredibly Detailed Diorama Photos of Urban Decay and War-Torn City Streets

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Tokyo-based artist Satoshi Araki is a man whose eye for the detail is immediately evident when you look at his dioramas… if you can even tell they’re dioramas, that is.

For each miniature, Araki painstakingly plans out the layout of his trashed and scattered street scenes and photographs in such a way that, often, you’d be hard-pressed to identify them as dioramas at all..

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The 45-year-old artist makes a living by crafting many of the items seen in the scenes he photographs, but in his free time, he enjoys putting his skills to use creating photographs of urban decay and war-torn streets.

Araki uses a variety of materials to create the lifelike scenes — from styrofoam to die-cast cars — sculpting and painting them to perfection. When he needs ideas, he says a simple Google image search gets the job done, providing him with enough visual inspiration to bring the pieces of plastic and styrofoam to life.

From miniature newspapers to Coke cans with Arabic branding, the meticulous nature of his work is truly impressive. Here are a set of images of his dioramas, as well as some behind the scenes images for scale:

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To keep up with Araki and his work, visit his website or follow him on Facebook.

(via Laughing Squid)


Image credits: Photographs by Satoshi Araki and used with permission