Archivi categoria: adobelightroom

7 Tips for Making Lightroom Run Faster

Not happy with Lightroom’s sluggish performance on your computer? Here’s a helpful 15-minute video in which photographer and instructor Anthony Morganti shares a number of helpful tips for optimizing your Lightroom’s performance.

The tips are various settings you can adjust and tools you can run inside Lightroom, from Catalog Settings to Preferences and more. Since photographers have different workflows and needs, customizing how Lightroom runs can help make it run faster for your own purposes.

Here’s a quick breakdown of the main performance optimization tips discussed in-depth in the video:

#1. Build 1:1 Previews: Make Lightroom create a 1:1 preview of your photo files, trading extra disk space and slower importing for faster performance while working with your photos.

#2: Discard Previews: Have Lightroom automatically discard your 1:1 previews after a certain number of days to free up disk space.

#3: Preview Size and Quality: Make sure your preview size and quality and set to appropriate settings for your monitor.

#4: Camera Raw Cache Settings: Increase your cache size as large as you can from the default of 1GB.

#5: Use Graphics Professor: Try enabling or disabling the use of your graphics processor to see if that improves performance.

#6: Smart Previews: You can give up disk space and editing quality by using Smart Previews for faster performance.

#7: Optimize Catalog: Use the built-in optimization tool to keep things humming along over time.

Watch the video at the top of the post for a more detailed look at how you can make these adjustments and what they can do for you.

The video is episode #92 in Morganti’s helpful Lightroom Quick Tips video series. You can find his entire collection of videos on his YouTube channel.

(via Anthony Morganti via Fstoppers)

This Free Lightroom Plugin Reveals the Active Focus Point in Your Photos

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Back in 2014, a free Lightroom Plugin called Show Focus Points blew up online. Unfortunately, that plugin hasn’t been updated in quite some time, so if you have a newer camera you were totally out of luck… until now.

Freelance Android developer and underwater photographer Joshua Musselwhite has created a brand new, free, open source plugin for Lightroom that does exactly what Show Focus Points used to do, namely: it shows you the active focus point when you pressed the shutter. His plugin is called Focus Point Viewer, and it’s available for your downloading pleasure over at GitHub, complete with a README doc that explains how to map your own camera’s focus points and add them to the plugin (the initial download only works with the Nikon D7200, Josh’s camera).

I shoot underwater photography. Often times the fish are moving around or I’m getting pushed by the surge, current, or any number of other things,” explains Josh on Reddit. “When reviewing my photos and editing it helps me to know if the focus point hit where I wanted it to or was I off.”

It takes “a couple of hours” to map your own camera to the plugin, but once you do it should work like a charm. Here are a few screenshots of the plugin in action, showing the focus point used in a couple of Josh’s own underwater images. As a bonus, it seems Josh has built a metadata viewer into the plugin as well:

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fp2

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It’s a simple tool, lacking some of the sophistication of the original Show Focus Points plugin, but since it’s Open Source you can bet some top notch developer/photographer will get their mitts on the code and turn it up to the next level.

In the meantime, us non-technical types can enjoy the basic functionality and additional info about each of our images.

Lightroom Tip: How to Match Different Photo Exposures in One Click

If you captured a range of exposures for a certain scene, you don’t have to painstakingly adjust each one once you’ve got them in Lightroom. This really useful tip from the folks at Adobe shows you how to do it in a single click.

When you’re out in a challenging lighting environment, it’s tempting to capture a range of different exposures per shot—either because you want to blend exposures or simply because you’re not sure which part of the scene you want to highlight. Once you’re back in Lightroom and you’ve decided on the exposure you like best, don’t go through each photo individually, tweaking exposure until you think you’ve matched it.

Use this quick Lightroom tip instead:

matchexposure_1

Select all of your photos, make sure your active photo is the exposure you want, and then go to Setting > Match Total Exposures (or type Alt+Shift+Command+M). This will intelligently and automatically alter the exposures on all of the photos so they match the active photo.

There you go: a single click to adjust as many photos as you need. For more 60-second Lightroom Coffee Break tips, head over to the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom channel on YouTube.

Lightroom Tip: How to Match Different Photo Exposures in One Click

If you captured a range of exposures for a certain scene, you don’t have to painstakingly adjust each one once you’ve got them in Lightroom. This really useful tip from the folks at Adobe shows you how to do it in a single click.

When you’re out in a challenging lighting environment, it’s tempting to capture a range of different exposures per shot—either because you want to blend exposures or simply because you’re not sure which part of the scene you want to highlight. Once you’re back in Lightroom and you’ve decided on the exposure you like best, don’t go through each photo individually, tweaking exposure until you think you’ve matched it.

Use this quick Lightroom tip instead:

matchexposure_1

Select all of your photos, make sure your active photo is the exposure you want, and then go to Setting > Match Total Exposures (or type Alt+Shift+Command+M). This will intelligently and automatically alter the exposures on all of the photos so they match the active photo.

There you go: a single click to adjust as many photos as you need. For more 60-second Lightroom Coffee Break tips, head over to the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom channel on YouTube.

Lightroom Tip: How to Match Different Photo Exposures in One Click

If you captured a range of exposures for a certain scene, you don’t have to painstakingly adjust each one once you’ve got them in Lightroom. This really useful tip from the folks at Adobe shows you how to do it in a single click.

When you’re out in a challenging lighting environment, it’s tempting to capture a range of different exposures per shot—either because you want to blend exposures or simply because you’re not sure which part of the scene you want to highlight. Once you’re back in Lightroom and you’ve decided on the exposure you like best, don’t go through each photo individually, tweaking exposure until you think you’ve matched it.

Use this quick Lightroom tip instead:

matchexposure_1

Select all of your photos, make sure your active photo is the exposure you want, and then go to Setting > Match Total Exposures (or type Alt+Shift+Command+M). This will intelligently and automatically alter the exposures on all of the photos so they match the active photo.

There you go: a single click to adjust as many photos as you need. For more 60-second Lightroom Coffee Break tips, head over to the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom channel on YouTube.

Quick Tip: How to Handle Difficult to Remove Spots in Lightroom

Longtime Adobe Lightroom team member Benjamin Warde shares a very useful little tip in this 60 second episode of Lightroom Coffee Break. If you’ve ever run across a difficult-to-clone spot in Lightroom, Warde shows you how to use a setting that will definitely help.

The “trick” is simple. Step 1: Go to the Tool Overlay menu in the bottom left and change that setting to “Never.” Step 2: Break down your difficult-to-remove spot (or, in this case, line) into discrete easier-to-clone bits.

That’s it! This simple, almost hidden setting makes previous adjustments invisible so they don’t interfere with your current edit, letting you break down a bigger problem into much smaller, manageable pieces.