Archivi categoria: adobe

Impressive Adobe Algorithm Transfers One Photo’s Style Onto Another

Two pairs of researchers from Cornell University and Adobe have teamed up and developed a “Deep Photo Style Transfer” algorithm that can automatically apply the style (read: color and lighting) of one photo to another. The early results are incredibly impressive and promising.

The software is an expansion on the tech used to transfer painting styles like Monet or Van Gogh to a photograph like the app Prisma. But instead of a painting, this program uses other photographs for reference.

“This paper introduces a deep-learning approach to photographic style transfer that handles a large variety of image content while faithfully transferring the reference style,” says the rather technical abstract of the Deep Photo Style Transfer paper.

Put more plainly: when you put in two photographs, the neural network-powered program analyzes the color and quality of light in the reference photo, and pastes that photo’s characteristics onto the second. This includes things like weather, season, and time of day—theoretically, a winter’s day can be turned into summer, or a cloudy day into a glorious sunrise.

The team’s early examples show the program in action. So this original photo:

Plus this reference photo:

Equals this final photo:

It’s important to note that the software does not alter the structure of the photo in any way, so there’s no risk of distorting the lines, edges or perspective. The entire focus is on mimicking the color and light in order to copy the “look” or “style” of a reference photograph onto a new shot.

Since this is a lot easier said than done, the program has to intelligently compensate for differences between the donor and receiving image. If there is less sky visible in the receiving image, it will detect this difference and not cause the sky to spill over into the rest of the original shot, for example.

The software even attempts to “achieve very local drastic effects,” such as turning on the lights on individual skyscraper windows, all without altering the original photo by moving windows around or distorting edges.

Let’s look at one more example. Here’s the original winter landscape shot:

When you plug it into the Deep Style Transfer program with this summer landscape as a reference image:

You get this odd creation:

In the future, a perfected version of this technology could make its way into Photoshop as a tool, or run as a separate program or plug-in. Not that you should bank on this tech fixing the photos from your upcoming trip; like any other new technology, there is work to be done.

“The study shows that our algorithm produces the most faithful style transfer results more than 80% of the time,” the paper cautions. So maybe you can’t change Ansel Adam’s Moonrise, Hernandez to a Sunrise, Hernandez, but you get the picture (no pun intended) and it is very promising.

If you’re interested in digging into the tech behind this creation, read the full paper at this link.

(via DPReview)

Adobe’s New Algorithm Makes Super Difficult Selections a Cinch

Adobe Research has been working on some pretty interesting photo and video editing features, but their latest research might just revolutionize photo editing as we know it. Imagine if Photoshop could automatically cut out complex subjects in seconds, no matter the background… no pen tool required.

Adobe’s selection tools have caught a lot of flack—especially the new Select and Mask environment—but this research intends to silence all the naysayers. Using a two-part process that involves a “deep convolutional encoder-decoder network” and a “small convolutional network,” Adobe can cut out any subject from in front of any background with ease and accuracy.

Keep in mind, this is 100% software-driven; there are no dual camera systems, green screens, or manual selection tricks required to make it work. And it works like gangbusters! In the example below, the original image is on the far left, the second and third images use competing methods, and the far right image is the mask created by Adobe’s software:

The accuracy demonstrated here and in latter examples in the full research paper is impressive to say the very least. Fine hair is cut out of complex and similarly-colored backgrounds with insane accuracy, and Adobe’s system seems to beat every other competing approach hands down.

The research team applied their approach to 1,000 test images after training their neural nets with a data set of 49,300 images, and the algorithm seems to have learned well.

While we have no idea when this research will make its way into a future version of Photoshop or After Effects, the impact of highly-accurate automatic selection and masking tool is not to be underestimated. Read the full paper for yourself at this link, and keep an eye out for some incredible advances from Adobe in the coming months and years.

(via DIYP)

7 Tips for Making Lightroom Run Faster

Not happy with Lightroom’s sluggish performance on your computer? Here’s a helpful 15-minute video in which photographer and instructor Anthony Morganti shares a number of helpful tips for optimizing your Lightroom’s performance.

The tips are various settings you can adjust and tools you can run inside Lightroom, from Catalog Settings to Preferences and more. Since photographers have different workflows and needs, customizing how Lightroom runs can help make it run faster for your own purposes.

Here’s a quick breakdown of the main performance optimization tips discussed in-depth in the video:

#1. Build 1:1 Previews: Make Lightroom create a 1:1 preview of your photo files, trading extra disk space and slower importing for faster performance while working with your photos.

#2: Discard Previews: Have Lightroom automatically discard your 1:1 previews after a certain number of days to free up disk space.

#3: Preview Size and Quality: Make sure your preview size and quality and set to appropriate settings for your monitor.

#4: Camera Raw Cache Settings: Increase your cache size as large as you can from the default of 1GB.

#5: Use Graphics Professor: Try enabling or disabling the use of your graphics processor to see if that improves performance.

#6: Smart Previews: You can give up disk space and editing quality by using Smart Previews for faster performance.

#7: Optimize Catalog: Use the built-in optimization tool to keep things humming along over time.

Watch the video at the top of the post for a more detailed look at how you can make these adjustments and what they can do for you.

The video is episode #92 in Morganti’s helpful Lightroom Quick Tips video series. You can find his entire collection of videos on his YouTube channel.

(via Anthony Morganti via Fstoppers)

Learn Photoshop Tricks in One Minute with Adobe’s ‘Make it Now’ Series

I once read a Quora question that went, “What can I learn in one minute that will be useful for the rest of my life?” I don’t know about the rest of your life, but if you’re a photographer, head over to the Adobe Creative Cloud YouTube channel and check out their ‘Make It Now’ one-minute video tutorials on designing (not retouching) with Photoshop CC.

One of the big problems I have with watching videos on the Web is that, half the time, I get 4 minutes into a 12-minute video that seemed useful before I realize that I was, in fact, totally wrong. There’s another 4 minutes I’m never getting back…

That’s why I love super short tutorial videos like these.

How to Make a Double Exposure

How to Create a Composite

How to Create an Animated GIF

How to Make a Poster from a Template

If you’re new to Photoshop, you may find the video moves too fast for you to keep up; if that’s the case, click on the gear symbol at the bottom right of the screen and select 0.5 speed. Heck, if you want to take notes, go for 0.25 speed.

And that’s it. Congrats! You can now add “Graphic Designer” to your LinkedIn profile! Okay maybe not…

(via Fstoppers)

How the Tone Curve REALLY Works, and 5 Ways Adobe Could Improve It

The tone curve is one of the most powerful tools in photo editing, allowing you to change multiple values and essentially doing the job of several different adjustment layers. But it’s also complicated, and hard for beginners to understand. These two videos should help.

The first video was shared by Photoshop Tutorials back in December, and it explains how tone curves REALLY work. From adjusting the main RGB curve to breaking down the curve into its Red, Green, and Blue components, the video explains the tone curve, offers some tips on learning how to use it, and shares plenty of examples of different curves in action.

That video alone is worth your time, especially if you still find the tone curve confusing. This next video add to it by suggesting a few design changes Adobe could do to make that would greatly improve the tool.

The video was shared two days ago by Denny Tang, and it attacks the tone curve from a different angle than most tutorials. This is an advice video for Adobe that shows what a major Curves redesign could look like in Lightroom and Photoshop to make the tool much easier to learn and use.

He lists 5 different changes, each of which will help you to better understand how the tone curve works. But even if Adobe pays no attention to Denny’s suggestions, the video will still leave you with a more comprehensive understanding of this powerful photo editing tool.

Datacolor Partners with Adobe to Offer the Ultimate Photography Workflow Bundle

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Scritto da Canon Rumors

Datacolor Partners with Adobe to Offer the Ultimate Photography Workflow Bundle Datacolor and Adobe work hand-in-hand to offer the ultimate package for your photography workflow. Save time, money and frustration –with an efficient editing process and more accurate viewing, proofing and printing. Get a complimentary Adobe Creative Cloud Photography plan – 90 day trial with Read more...

Adobe Raising Prices on Creative Cloud Subscriptions in UK & Sweden

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Scritto da Canon Rumors

Adobe has informed customers in the UK and Sweden that pricing on their Creative Cloud subscriptions come March 6, 2017. Adobe cites extreme currency fluctuations for the reason behind the pricing increase. Below is an email UK customers have received from Adobe We hope you are enjoying your subscription to the world-class products and services Read more...